Don’t succumb to the pressures of Christmas

Christmas is about spending time with the ones you love, making memories and enjoying quality time together. When you have a new baby, every day can bring its own challenges, so having to cope with the demands of the festive season can be overwhelming for parents.

 

 

This is when you need to be a little bit selfish. Don’t feel like you need to try and please everyone – your main focus is you and your little family.

 

It’s inevitable that people will all want to be a part of Christmas when you have a little one – even more so if it’s your baby’s first one. But you need to be strong and set some boundaries. Maybe your parents want you to go there for dinner, but they might not live close – do you want to rush through your morning, then gather up all of the zillion things you might need to see you through the day, before you spend a few hours in a car with a (potentially screaming) baby? NO? Then don’t do it!

 

Perhaps your in-laws want to see you all on Boxing Day, but you may well want to relax, watching a film. Then do that instead! This is YOUR Christmas, you don’t need to try and please everyone, because it’s highly unlikely that you will be able to. There will come a time, later in your child’s life, when you are able to trot off here there and everywhere without a care in the world. But, for now, if every time you leave the house it feels like a military mission, then don’t put that pressure on yourself over Christmas.

 

Another thing that can cause undue pressure at this time of year is present buying. The chances are, if you have a young baby then the thought of going Christmas shopping can be daunting – and quite possibly the last thing on your mind! Don’t worry about trying to find the perfect presents for everyone… if all your friends and family get vouchers this year then that’s fine!

 

The most important thing to remember at this time of year is to be strong. Do what you and your partner want to do – let everyone else worry about themselves. Don’t fret about offending people; they’ll get over it.